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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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16	HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
A second time inviting the attention of the Senate to our own com- 
pact with Hawaii, President Johnson said, December 9, 1868:
It is known and felt by the Hawaiian Government and people that their Govern- 
ment and institutions are feeble and precarious; that the United States, being so 
near a neighbor, would be unwilling to see the islands pass under foreign control. 
Their prosperity is continually disturbed by expectations and alarms of unfriendly 
political proceedings, as well from the United States as from other foreign powers. 
A reciprocity treaty, while it could not materially diminish the revenues of the 
United States, would be a guaranty of the goodwill and forbearance of all nations 
until the people of the islands shall of themselves, at no distant day, voluntarily 
apply for admission into the Union. (Appendix.)
During the last mentioned year the subject of annexation continued 
to appear as an important feature of the correspondence from time to 
time, and on April 14 a letter to Mr. E. P. Spaulding, a member of 
Congress, from his son, Mr. Z. S. Spaulding, in charge of the United 
States legation, reported the projected organization of an active an- 
nexation party in Honolulu, and the prevalence of such a sentiment in 
the Kingdom. Mr. Seward was again obliged to defer immediate con- 
sideration of the subject by reason of the administration's absorption 
in domestic affairs relating to reconstruction. (Appendix.)
In 1868 a remonstrance was made by the United States representa- 
tive at Honolulu on the subject of the importation of coolies into the 
islands, and a resolution of the Senate of the United States, describing 
the traffic in human beings, already substantially extirpated, as ab- 
horrent to the spirit of modern international law and policy, and to the 
advanced sentiment of the great civilized powers, was brought to the 
attention of the Hawaiian Government. This intervention, however, 
was not effectual to stop or even moderate the business in the face of 
British and other influences, and the trade continued a threatening 
danger to the Kingdom. (Appendix.)
In February, 1871, Mr. Pierce, our minister at Honolulu, wrote rec- 
ommending the subject of annexation to the attention of the President, 
and President Grant transmitted this most interesting dispatch to the 
Senate, confidentially, with a message soliciting the views of that body 
upon the matter. This message and dispatch are of so much interest 
and importance that it is deemed best to present the executive docu- 
ment in toto in this place.
[Confidential.   Executive B.   Forty-second Congress first session.]
MESSAGE  OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, TRANSMITTING A COPY OF A 
DISPATCH RELATIVE TO THE ANNEXATION OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, ADDRESSED 
TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE BY HENRY A. PIERCE, MINISTER RESIDENT OF 
THE UNITED STATES AT HONOLULU.
APRIL 7, 1871. - Read and, with the dispatch referred to the Committee on Foreign 
Relations, ordered to be printed in confidence for the use of the Senate.
To the Senate of the United States:
I transmit confidentially, for the information and consideration of the Senate, a 
copy of a dispatch of the 25th of February last, relative to the annexation of the 
Hawaiian Islands, addressed to the Department of State by Henry A. Pierce, min- 
ister resident of the United States at Honolulu. Although I do not deem it advisa- 
ble to express any opinion or to make any recommendation in regard to the subject 
at this juncture, the views of the Senate, if it should be deemed proper to express 
them, would be very acceptable with reference to any future course which there 
might be a disposition to adopt.
C. S. GRANT.
WASHINGTON, April 6, 1871.

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