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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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HAWAIIAN  ISLANDS.	183 
Admiral Brown to the Secretary of the Navy.
Copy No, 275.J     UNITED STATES CRUISER SAN FRANCISCO,
FLAGSHIP OF THE PACIFIC STATION,
San Francisco, Cal., September 6, 1892. 
Hon. SECRETARY OF THE NAVY,
    Navy Department, Washington, D. C. :
SIR : At the time this ship sailed from Honolulu, on the 27th ultimo, 
everything was extremely quiet.
There is a strong sentiment existing in Hawaii, among the native 
Hawaiians as well as among the Americans and Germans, in favor of 
a change in the form of government, looking toward the ultimate an- 
nexation of the islands to the United States.
This subject of annexation has been freely discussed by individuals 
for a long time, but until very recently there has been no combined 
concert of action. There now exists in Honolulu an organization com- 
prising the most prominent annexationists, which has for its object the 
formulation of some plan by which a change of government can be 
affected quietly, and with the consent and cooperation of the Queen 
and the members of her cabinet and staff.
It is thought that the Queen will consent to abdicate in favor of a 
republican form of government if she can be assured that a suitable 
provision will be made for her in the way of a permanent pecuniary 
settlement.
The organization I refer to will not countenance anything of a revo- 
lutionary character in the way of force, but expects to be aided by the 
majority of the Hawaiians who now favor annexation without having 
any ideas of how such an event can be reached.
A change in the present cabinet will certainly be made before the 
present legislature adjourns. There is trouble in obtaining a new cabi- 
net, because the reform parties can not agree on the men to go into the 
different positions. The liberal party is in the majority, and will not be 
allowed to have any voice in the question of the new ministry. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
GEO. BROWN, 
Rear-Admiral U. S. Navy, 
Commanding U. S. Naval Force, Pacific Station.
Mr. Stevens to Mr. Foster.
[Confidential.]
No. 65.]	UNITED STATES LEGATION,
Honolulu, September 14, 1892.
SIR: In my dispatch, No. 64, of September 9, I expressed the hope 
that I would be able to send the information by this mail that a new 
Hawaiian cabinet had been formed to take the place of the one so em- 
phatically voted out by the legislature, but the deadlock between the 
Queen and the legislature continues. She has announced a new cabi- 
net, but it is so unsatisfactory to the legislative majority and the busi- 
ness men of the islands that it will undoubtedly be rejected to-day; 
but the vote will not be taken in time to send the information of the 
fact by this mail, which closes at 11 a.m. The Tahitian half-caste fa-

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