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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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HAWAIIAN  ISLANDS.	185
on the United States representatives by anonymous writers in the 
official organ of the Government. The election resulted in a victory 
for the ministry.
The British representatives manifest the most unusual interest, pub- 
licly, in all political proceedings. The action of the ministry, with 
possibly one exception, and of the English element, is plainly in oppo- 
sition to the United States.
There is a large and growing sentiment, particularly among the 
planters, in favor of annexation to the United States, but I am in- 
formed that the leaders do not think an opportune moment will arrive 
for some time to come. However, everything seems to point toward 
an eventual request for annexation.
The political situation at present is more quiet and will probably re- 
main so until another resolution of want of confidence is passed, which 
is not likely in the immediate future.
The financial question is the most important question to be met by 
the ministry.
Very respectfully,
G. C. WILTSE, 
Captain, Commanding.
Capt. Wiltse to the Secretary of the Navy.
U. S. S. BOSTON (SECOND RATE), 
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, October 20, 1892. 
The SECRETARY OF THE NAVY,
Navy Department, Washington, D. C.:
SIB : I have the honor to report that, since my last letter, on Monday, 
October 17, a want of confidence resolution was unexpectedly intro- 
duced and passed by a vote of 31 to 15, forcing the ministry to resign. 
The political situation is still unsettled.
It is thought that the names of the new cabinet will be sent to the 
legislature by Monday next, October 24. If the new ministry is ac- 
ceptable to the majority, legislation will be resumed and affairs become 
more settled. If, however, the Queen persists in consulting only her 
own inclination, regardless of the wishes of the opposition, which is a 
large majority, it is difficult to predict what will be the outcome.
I inclose a paper giving an account of the proceedings, etc., when 
the want of confidence resolution was introduced. 
Very respectfully.
G. C. WILTSE, 
Captain, Commanding.
Mr. Stevens to Mr. Foster.
[Confidential.]
No. 72.]	UNITED STATES LEGATION,
Honolulu, October 31, 1892.
SIR:  In dispatch 71 of October 19 I gave account of the rejection 
of the new cabinet appointed by the Queen in defiance of a previously 
expressed majority of the legislature. The deadlock continues. 
Though two weeks have elapsed since the decisive action of the legis-

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