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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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188	HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.
remain unpaid until the legislature appropriates the money according 
to law.
The Queen persists in refusing to appoint a cabinet in conformity 
with the wishes of the majority, and it is possible that her obstinacy 
may precipitate a crisis. 
Very respectfully,
G. C. WILTSE, 
Captain, U. S. Navy, Commanding U.S.S. Boston.
Capt. Wiltse to the Secretary of the Navy.
U.S.S. BOSTON (SECOND RATE), 
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, November 9, 1892. 
The SECRETARY OF THE NAVY,
Navy Department, Washington, D. C.:
SIR : I have the honor to report that the danger of a political crisis 
in the Hawaiian Kingdom seems to have passed.
The Queen has appointed a cabinet, after much pressure had been 
brought to bear, that is strong financially and favorable to American 
interests. The new ministry will probably be supported by the legis- 
lature, although much opposition has been aroused among the native 
members because they are not represented. It is doubtful, however, if 
the natives can secure enough votes to vote the cabinet out, though 
they would do so if possible.
I am informed, from reliable sources, that the Queen had been 
strongly advised to dissolve the legislature and order a new election, 
which would have been unconstitutional, and which would probably 
have caused a revolution; but she was deterred by the presence of 
United States vessels of war.
I inclose paper containing editorials on the situation. 
Very respectfully,
G. C. WILTSE, 
Captain, Commanding U. S. S. Boston.
Mr. Stevens to Mr. Foster.
[Confidential.]
No. 74.]	UNITED STATES LEGATION,
Honolulu, November 20, 1892.
SIR:  Fidelity to the trust imposed on me by the President, the De- 
partment of State, and the Senate, requires that I should make a care- 
ful and full statement of the financial, agricultural, social, and political 
condition of these islands. An intelligent and impartial examination 
of the facts can hardly fail to lead to the conclusion that the relations 
and policy of the United States toward Hawaii will soon demand 
some change, if not the adoption of decisive measures, with the aim 
to secure American interests and future supremacy by encouraging 
Hawaiian development and aiding to promote responsible government 
in these islands. It is unnecessary for me to allude to the deep in- 
terest and the settled policy of the United States Government in re-

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