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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.	405
[Inclosure 2.] 
The Hawaiian Provisional Government to Mr. Stevens,
HONOLULU, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, January 31, 1893.
Sir: Believing that we are unable to satisfactory protect life and property, and  
to prevent civil disorders in Honolulu and throughout the Hawaiian Islands, we 
hereby, in obedience to the instructions of the advisory council, pray that you will 
raise the flag of the United States of America for the protection of the Hawaiian Is- 
lands for the time being, and to that end we hereby confer upon the Government of 
United States, through yon, freedom of occupation of the public buildings of this 
Government, and of the soil of this country, so far as may be necessary for the 
exercise of such protection, but not interfering with the administration of public 
affairs by this Government. 
We have, etc.,
SANFORD B. DOLE, 
President of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands,
and Minister of Foreign Affairs.     
J. A. KING,
Minister of Interior. 
P. C. JONES,
Minister of Finance. 
WILLIAM O. SMITH,
Attorney-General. 
His Excellency JOHN L. STEVENS,
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United Slates,
Mr. Stevens to Mr. Foster,
[Telegram.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,
Honolulu, February 8, 1893. 
The affairs of state continue to be hopeful. Hoisting flag in protec- 
tion of this Government was expected. Subjects who were doubtful, 
now for annexation. The natives showed unexpected regard of the 
United States flag. Prudent conduct of Capt. Wiltse, the officers and 
crew of the Boston, credit to the Navy. Can not send by mail.
STEVENS.
Mr, Stevens to Mr. Foster.
No. 85.]	          UNITED STATES LEGATION,
Honolulu, February 8, 1893.
SIR: As I have already indicated by cipher telegram of this date, 
political affairs here continue to have a hopeful aspect. The raising of 
the United States flag and the published proclamation of temporary 
American protectorate of the islands, so far, appear to be having a 
more beneficial effect than could have been reasonably anticipated. 
Foreign residents, before in doubt, are now expressing satisfaction that 
the American flag has been raised here, and are hoping that it will not 
be lowered, believing annexation best for all concerned. The native 
Hawaiians are showing an unexpected regard for our flag. The fallen 
Queen has conducted herself so shamefully and shown so much favor- 
itism to foreign adventurers that all the better portions of the natives had 
ceased to have legal reverence for her. Her bold, unblushing associa-

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