University of Hawaii at Manoa Library

Home: The Annexation Of Hawaii: A Collection Of Document



hawnpac@hawaii.edu
(808) 956-8264

Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

[ Previous Page ] -- [ View PDF ] -- [ View in MS Word ] -- [ Next Page ]

                             HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.	601
of the Hawaiian Islands and those owing allegiance to foreign countries.)
Americans number 1,928; natives and half-castes, 40,612; Chinese, 15,301; Japanese, 12,360; 
Portuguese, 8,602; British, 1,344; Germans, 1,034; French, 70; Norwegians, 227; Polynesians, 588, and 
other foreigners, 419.
It is well at this point to say that of the 7,495 Hawaiian-born foreigners 4,117 are Portuguese, 1,701 Chinese 
and Japanese, 1,617 other white foreigners, and 60 of other nationalities.
There are 58,714 males. Of these 18,364 are pure natives and 3,085 are half-castes, making together 
21,449. Fourteen thousand five hundred and twenty-two (14,522) are Chinese. The Japanese number 
10,079. The Portuguese contribute 4,770. These four nationalities furnish 50,820 of the male population.
Males. The Americans ......................................... 
1,298
The British..............................................    982
The Germans ........................t...................    729
The French..............................................      46
The Norwegians .........................................    135
These five nationalities combined furnish 3,170 of the total male population.
The first four nationalities when compared with the last five in male population are nearly sixteenfold the 
largest in number.
The Americans are to those of the four aforementioned group of nationalities as 1 to 39-nearly as 1 to 
40.
Portuguese have been brought here from time to time from the Madeira and Azores islands by the 
Hawaiian Government as laborers, on plantations, just as has been done in relation to Chinese, Japanese, 
Polynesians, etc. They are the most ignorant of all imported laborers, and reported to be very thievish. 
They are not pure Europeans, but a commingling of many races, especially the negro. They intermarry with 
the natives and belong to the laboring classes. Very few of them can read and write. Their children are 
being taught in the public schools, as all races are. It is wrong to class them as Europeans.
The character of the people of these islands is and must be overwhelmingly Asiatic. Let it not be 
imagined that the Chinese, Japanese, and Portuguese disappear at the end of their contract term. From the 
report of the inspector-in-chief of Japanese immigrants on March 31, 1892, it appears that twenty "lots" 
of Japanese immigrants have been brought here by the Hawaiian Government, numbering 21,110. Of 
these, 2,517 have returned to Japan; 8,592, having worked out their contract term, remain, and 9,626 are 
still working out their contract term. More than 75 per cent may be said to locate here permanently.
There are 13,067 Chinamen engaged in various occupations, to wit: 8,763 laborers, 1,479 farmers, 133 
fishermen, 74 drivers and teamsters, 564 mechanics, 42 planters and ranchers, 776 merchants and traders, 
164 clerks and salesmen, 12 professional men and teachers, and 1,056 in various other occupations.
The number of merchants and traders in the entire country is 1,238. Of this number 776 are Chinamen 
and 81 are Americans.
The largest part of the retail trade seems to be conducted by Chinamen.
Of 20,536 laborers on sugar plantations only 2,617 are Chinese. Of this latter number only 396 are 
contract laborers.
The Portuguese population in 1884 amounted to 9,377 and in 1890 to 8,602, a loss of 776. These have been 
leaving in considerable numbers

Return to Top

Terms of Use  |  UH Mānoa  |  UH System  |  Ask Us
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Library  |  2550 McCarthy Mall  |  Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 USA
808-956-7214 (Reference)  |  808-956-7203 (Circulation)  |  808-956-7205 (Administration)
808-956-5968 (fax)  |  library@hawaii.edu