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                                 HAWAIIAN  ISLANDS.                       817
ment or amendments shall be agreed 
to by two-thirds of all the members of 
the Legislature, such amendment or 
amendments shall become part of the 
constitution of this Kingdom.
Kalakaua rex. 
By the King:
W. L. green,
Minister of Finance.
Honolulu, Oahu, ss.
..                                                            I,  Kalakaua, King of the 
Hawaiian
Islands, in the presence of Almighty 
God, do solemnly swear to maintain 
this constitution whole and inviolate, 
and to govern in conformity 
therewith.
Kalakaua rex.
*o	Subscribed   and sworn to before me 
this sixth day of July, A. D. 1887. 
A. F. Judd,
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 
1	            and Chancellor of the 
Kingdom.    ''
' 
No. 24.	
Statement of Charles T. Gulick.
AGENCY OF UNITED STATES MINISTER STJ5VENS AND CAPT. 
WILTSE, COMMANDING U. S. S. BOSTON, IN THE OVERTHROW 
OF THE HAWAIIAN GOVERNMENT, WHICH WAS EFFECTED 
JANUARY 17,1893.
When Mr. Stevens presented his credentials to His Majesty, Kalakaua, as 
United States minister resident near the Hawaiian court, he gave the King a 
lecture on his duties as a sovereign, and at the same time hinted, in an 
ambiguous way, at the possibilities of the future. The subject matter of the 
address, and the manner of Mr. Stevens, were so offensive as to very nearly 
produce disagreeable consequences, as the King was on the point of abruptly 
terminating the interview and demanding the recall of Mr. Stevens. The 
unpleasant episode passed, however, without subsequent notice.
Col. G. W. Macfarlane and Dr. G. Trousseau will confirm the foregoing.
On the occasion of the Fourth of July celebration in 1891, Mr. Stevens 
delivered an oration at the music hall in which he took the opportunity to show 
his very thinly veiled contempt for the Sovereign and Government to which he 
was accredited. His sentiments were more distinctly emphasized in his speech 
on Memorial Hay, 1802, leaving no room for doubt with regard to his real 
meaning. In October, 1892, the Daily Bulletin, a newspaper published in 
Honolulu, contained a criticism on Mr. Stevens' tardiness in causing a search 
for a missing boat's crew (supposed to be somewhere to windward of the 
island of Hawaii) belonging to an American vessel which had burned at sea.
Mr. Stevens called in a rage at the foreign office and in his interview 
with the minister of foreign affairs endeavored to fasten on the cabinet 
responsibility for the comments in the Bulletin and demanded, as he 
termed it, "full satisfaction," His manner and language were in the 
highest degree undiplomatic and offensive, and he would accept no 
explanation. He immediately followed up the insult by demanding an 
audience with the Queen without the usual formality of the presence 
F R 94-app II--52

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