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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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              996	HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.
various native estates, mentioned before. Of course all have interests in plantations, outside, I think, of Dole and 
Thurston. These people on the whole are good enough people, honest, I dare say on any subject in which, their 
ambition or their interest is not directly connected. But they are all suffering from a very serious complaint, a 
swelled head, incurable I am afraid. But I must not abuse your patience any longer, and will subscribe myself, 
Yours, respectfully,
G. Trousseau.
Since writing the above memorial I have had communication of a pamphlet shortly to be published by Mr. 
Stevens. I will not discuss the very lame apology he gives for his interference nor the absolutely false statements in 
which he indulges. These 1 believe sufficiently elucidated by your personal information. But his slanderous attacks 
on the private character of the Queen I will not leave unchallenged.
In my memorial I referred to the undoubted influence Charles B. Wilson had over the Queen. I will now explain 
that influence. Wilson persuaded the Queen, I believe, that she was safe in his hands. He is a determined man, has 
got plenty of personal courage, and often told the Queen that, had he been marshal of the Kingdom in 1887, the 
King never would have been compelled by the force of arms to sign the constitution; he would have nipped the 
conspiracy in the bud. Right or wrong, the Queen believed him, hence his influence.
I have known the Queen intimately for over twenty years. When I arrived here she had not been married long, and 
her husband, John O. Dominis, an American, and an intimate friend of mine, was fondly beloved by her. John 
Dominis's character was unimpeachable-ask any one who knew him-Mr. C. R. Bishop, Mr. W. F. Allen, and 
others. I am now speaking from a physician's point of view. John was, to use a euphemism, rather irregular as a 
husband-as many husbands in my experience are. He was fond of society, sometimes took more liquor than was 
good for him, and occasionally (although he never kept a regular mistress) had some love adventures. In this small 
community they were reported to his wife, and 1 can vouch to how she suffered by it. She was exceedingly fond 
and jealous of him. But, like most unfaithful husbands, he would not have for one moment shut his eyes on even 
any sign of unfaithfulness on the part of his wife. As long as he was alive. any one slandering his wife would have, I 
assure you, been severely punished. If there has been any failing in the Queen's faithfulness to her husband it never 
has been known, and as far as Wilson is concerned, it is on the part of Mr. Stevens an unmitigated lie. Did I know 
that Mr. Stevens would resent it as we do in my country I would to day go and give him the lie. But he would 
probably have me arrested and convicted, and, busy as I am with my arduous profession, I can't afford it.
Mr. Wilson has a half-white wife, an intimate friend of the Queen. Although not a young woman, she is still 
attractive, and has been one of the prettiest half-white women in Honolulu. I have also been her physician and 
known her well. She is, and always has been, of a jealous disposition, and notwithstanding Mr. Stevens' abominable 
statement, would never countenance an intimacy between her husband and any other woman, even were she the 
Queen. She is now more attractive than the Queen is or ever has been.
That Mr. Stevens believes these stories I strongly doubt. They suit his purpose. If he is not wholly responsible for 
them, he has accepted them, without control, from Sereno Bishop, and others who know better.

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