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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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               1012	HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.
cabinet were at the meeting. They worked around about using all their influence to work upon the native members 
by means of promises and money. Then the Macfarlane cabinet was voted out. The natives stack together to hold 
that cabinet in.
Q. How was the vote on that?
A. Twenty-seven to twenty-eight.
Q. Who furnished the money?
A. Friends of the Reform people. The Reform knew that their friends were using money to get some native votes 
to get that cabinet out.
Q. How do you know that money was being used?
A. I was told so, and I know it is a fact.
Q. How do you know it is a fact?
A. It was talked about.   It was general belief.
Q. Was it generally believed, as you do, that the majority was gotten by the use of money?
A. Yes. (Continuing.) Then this cabinet of Cornwell, Nawaki, Creighton, and Gulick came in. We had a meeting 
the previous night. We all decided we would vote them out without ceremony.
Q. Who decided that?    Who was the meeting composed of?
A. Reform and Liberal. Because we felt the Queen was ignoring the majority of the house.
The cabinet was voted out in three hours. Then, afterwards, it took two weeks to form the Wilcox cabinet, which 
was composed of the Reform party. The Liberal was left out this time. I was a Liberal, but I didn't kick. I said I 
would keep still; I would pay them back in some way. Bush was a Liberal then; he was kicking. Ashford was at 
Hawaii. Finally the Queen's party commenced working against this cabinet. Mr. Parker asked me how I would vote. 
I told him I was tired about the cabinet, and I asked him if he was going to be in. He said yes. He asked me if I 
would take some position abroad. I told him I could not take a position except as minister. He said we were were 
going to have a new constitution. He said that as soon as they have a new cabinet they would proclaim a new 
constitution.
I did not believe what he said. I think he was merely working to get people to vote the cabinet out. I told him 
there was no need of a new constitution for giving a friend a position abroad. He said they might send me out as 
consul-general to Hongkong. I said the cabinet did not act right and could expect nothing from me. When they 
brought the resolution against that cabinet I stood and explained my vote. I explained where they stood, so we had 
25 votes when that cabinet was voted out. On the 13th, which was Friday, the new cabinet was formed by the 
Queen, Sam Parker, Cornwell, Colburn, and Peterson.
I want to explain the influence of the white population here about voting. Macfarlane and Paul Neumann, when 
their places were vacant-two candidates were put out by the Reform party, called the Missionary party, Mr. 
Waterhouse and Mark Robinson, and the other party put up--
Q. What other party?
A. The other foreign element here. They put up Mr. Maile and Mr. Hopkins.
Q. What do you mean by this other foreign element?
A. I mean non-missionaries, as noble voters. They need to get foreign voters to elect nobles. All the missionaries 
stood solid to vote for their candidate.
Q. Were the whites defeated in that election?

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