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                      1032	           HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.
were brick buildings full of sugar or other goods of a similar nature between the two spots, and the building was safe 
from being undermined, as the foundation is one solid mass of concrete from the coral of bed rock, and it would 
take mouths to undermine this, even with the most improved implements. As on the previous evening, I kept an 
extra guard at the police station all night. That night I received information that a caucus had been held at Mr. Henry 
Waterhouse's.
The following Monday, the 16th, I received information that the committee of safety were to meet at Thurston's 
office. I went over shortly afterwards to Mr. Thurston's office and met him and asked of him what they intended to 
do to-day, and also said to him that they had gone too far, as the matter of the promulgation of a new constitution 
was now settled and there would be a proclamation issued by the Queen to that effect. Thurston said, "I am sorry for 
the country, but what guaranty have we that this will not happen again. It is living on a volcano; there is no telling 
when it will explode." At this, I said if the foreign representatives are satisfied with the proclamation, that you 
people should be, and also as long as I was there it would not occur again in that way. He then replied: "Suppose 
you were to die to-night, what then?" I said "That is going to extremes; you are unreasonable, and we can not come 
to any terms." He said: "Charlie, it can not be helped now; it has gone too far and there is no one to blame but 
herself." I said: "I am sorry we can not agree about that," and left him. While I was talking with him I could see the 
members of the committee coming upstairs and going into the office formerly occupied by Mr. Frear, and close the 
door after entering. I then went over to the police station and gave instructions for the enlistment of men as special 
constables, and also sent an armed guard to the attorney-general's office in charge of Capt. E. P, Waipa, to receive 
instructions from the attorney-general, Mr. A. P. Peterson.
At 10 a. m. a committee from the conspirators had a meeting with the cabinet in the foreign office. I sent for Capt. 
Nowlien and told him to enlist volunteers and to send me 75 stand of Winchester repeating rifles, and for him to take 
what ammunition was wanted for the artillery (as it was then in my custody), and to get all the powder he required 
from the Government public powder magazine, and put it in the magazine at the barracks. By 12 m. the above was 
carried out and I had 700 men and over enrolled, mostly Hawaiians ready to take up arms in support of the Queen's 
Government, and a reserve of about 500 men, mostly foreigners. At about 12:30 p. m. the Queen's proclamation was 
printed and circulated throughout the city. It read as follows:

BY AUTHORITY
Her Majesty's ministers desire to express their appreciation for the quiet and order which has prevailed in this 
community since the events of Saturday, and are authorized to say that the position taken by Her Majesty in regard 
to the promulgation of a new constitution was under the stress of her native subjects. Authority is given for the 
assurance that any changes desired in the fundamental law of the land will be sought only by methods provided in 
the constitution itself. Her Majesty's ministers request all citizens to accept the assurance of Her Majesty in the same 
spirit in which it is given.
Liliuokalani,
Samuel Parker,
Minister of Foreign Affairs. 
W.  H.   Cornwell,
      Minister of Finance. 
John F. Colburn, 
           Minister of the Interior. 
	A. P.  Peterson,
            Attorney-General



Iolani Palace, January 16, 1893.

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