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               1224       		HAWAIIAN   ISLANDS.

You further call my attention to an extract of the same letter, page 42, which you quote as follows:
"As a result of which this Government has been and now is subject to the necessity of increased watchfulness and 
large additional expense, which but for such attitude would have been unnecessary." I find that you have left out a 
line belonging to this part of my letter, which should read as follows:
"As a result of which this Government has been obliged to increase its forces and has been and now is subjected to 
the necessity of increased watchfulness and large additional expense, which but for such attitude would have been 
unnecessary." As I have already verbally assured your excellency, when you kindly called my attention informally 
to the words importing the present tense into this sentence, such a meaning was not intended and is inconsistent with 
other expressions of my letter, I then requested you to erase the words "and now is" and promised to make the same 
correction in my copy of the letter, which has been done.
You further call my attention to another extract from my letter of December 27, 1893, but you make no comment on 
these extracts. Being ignorant of your reasons for calling my attention to these passages, I am unable to consider 
them, and ask that you will at your convenience state such reasons.
I have the honor to be, sir, your excellency's most obedient servant,
Sanford B. Dole, Minister of Foreign Affairs.
His Excellency Albert S. Willis,
U. S. Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Honolulu.

Mr. Willis to Mr. Gresham.

No. 32.]						Legation of the United States,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, February 2, 1894.

Sir: In my dispatch No. 10, of December 9, 1893, transmitting an interview with Col. C. B. Wilson, former marshal 
of the Kingdom, reference is made by him to a list of special and supplementary advisers whom he had selected, and 
among whom were many of the most prominent and influential citizens. It was not claimed by Mr. Wilson, as far as 
I am informed, that the selection by him was with the knowledge or consent of these gentlemen, some of whom in 
the daily press, and others to me in person, have so stated. Among these are Hon. Richard F. Bickerton, first 
associate justice of the supreme court, Hon. W. Austin Whiting, first judge circuit court, and Hon. F. A. Schaefer, 
who explicitly disavow any knowledge of the said list, and state that the use of their names was entirely 
unauthorized and unwarranted. The same disavowal is made by Hon. A. G. M. Robertson, Hon. Paul Neumann, 
Messrs. Jaraes H. Boyd, Henry Smith, Thomas E. Lucas, W. M. Cunningham, and others. It is doubtful whether any 
of those whose names are on these lists were informed of the fact. 
Very respectfully,
Albert W. Willis.

Mr. Willis to Mr. Gresham.

No. 33.]						Legation of the United States,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, January 20, 1894.
Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of January 12, 1894, sent to W. A. Cooper, U. S. 
dispatch agent at San Francisco, and by him forwarded, which reached here to-day.
Permit me to express my thanks for your words of approval.
I will, as directed, endeavor to keep the Department fully informed of the course of events and will, until further 
notice, consider that my

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