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Blount Report: Affairs in Hawaii

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1344	HAWAIIAN INFORMATION.

year Mr. Blount presided, and prior to that under the monarchy the custom has
prevailed for many years. The day was celebrated this year with more than ordinary enthusiasm. The
 English, Japanese, and American war vessels were dressed, flags were displayed from all the legations
 and consulates, public buildings and a large number of private residences were elaborately decorated,
 and the national salute fired at noon.
The reception at the United States legation was attended by several hundred persons, including
 representatives of the home and foreign governments and prominent citizens of all political parties.
I inclose newspaper clippings, giving some of the particulars of the celebration and also the principal
 address on the occasion. With sentiments of high esteem, I am, etc.,
albert S. willis.
[Inclosure 1 in No. 64.]
A FITTING CELEBRATION - THE GREAT HOLIDAY OF AMERICA AND OF HAWAII - 
EXERCISES AT LITTLE BRITAIN - THE FULL TEXT OF THE ORATIONS MADE BY VARIOUS 
SPEAKERS - Patriotic SPEECHES WHICH ALL HAVE THIS RING OF TRUE
REPUBLICANISM - A LARGE AUDIENCE.
The one hundred and eighteenth anniversary of the Declaration of the Independence of the United
States was marked, besides the one great event of the day, the forming of the Republic, by enthusiastic
ceremonies at J. N. Wright's place, Little Britain. At half after 10, the hour set for the literary exercises
to commence, the large pavilion was filled with those who came to celebrate the day in the good old
way by listening to patriotic speeches, and hearing the Declaration of Independence, one of, if not
they grandest of the world's documents, read.
The pavilion had been gaily decorated with American flags and with ferns. On the platform were
President Dole, Minister Willis, Admiral Walker, Capt. Barker, Capt. Cochrane, J. B. Atherton, P. C.
Jones, Prof. W. W. Lovejoy, Leo Cooper, and the newspaper representatives.
Minister Willis, the president of the day, was introduced by J. B. Atherton. He said:
"I thank the committee for having given me the honor of presiding on this occasion, and in the name 
of the great Republic whose representative I am, I extend to the citizens of the United States and to all 
others who sympathize with republican institutions, a heartfelt welcome."
Prof. Lovejoy then offered a prayer, after which the song " The Battle Cry of Free-
dom" was sung by the audience.   Mr. Leo Cooper then read the Declaration of Independence, which
 was greeted with much applause.
J. B. Castle was next introduced, and said that the paper he was going to read had
been prepared by W. N. Armstrong, who had asked him to road it, as he was away

[Inclosure 2 in No. 64.] CAPT. COCHRANE'S ADDRESS.
Mr. chairman, ladies, and gentlemen: I would that I could also say "fellow-citizens,"but I see so many
here who are not yet Americans that perhaps it were better to employ a new expression - fellow
-denizens. [This reference to possible annexation, and to the article so much discussed by the late 
convention, met with instant recognition.] When your committee did me the honor to invite me to 
address you upon this famous anniversary, I accepted with much pleasure. It was understood that I was
to make a short address on the Declaration of Independence, and that the orations larger contract
was to be awarded to another. Later, I was asked if I would change places, and as the difference was
only one of degrees, I readily consented. I met the gentleman who was to be my colleague, ex-
Attorney-General Armstrong, and we agreed to have a conference, that we might not collide. Next I 
learned that Mr. Armstrong was going to Hilo and that there would be no other speaker. You can 
therefore imagine my surprise at learning just now that friend Armstrong had left his oration behind.

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