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                             2031
in their civic system?   Unless that can be done, we are without reason for this 
unnecessary act.
Mr. TILLMAN. Mr. President, will the Senator from Alabama allow me?
     The PRESIDING OFFICER.   Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from South Carolina? 
    Mr. MORGAN.    I do.
Mr. TILLMAN. Is there any analogy between the government of the Creeks 
or the civilized Indiana in the Indian Territory and the Hawaiian government?
Mr. MORGAN. The analogy is this, Mr. President: They both have written 
constitutions; they both have officers appointed under their own authority; 
they both have a judicial as well as a legislative system with a supreme court; 
they both have the opinions of the supreme court published in authentic form; 
they both have their legislative proceedings published in like manner, and 
conduct absolutely and without question all of the powers and functions of 
civil government, republican in form. I think that is analogy enough.
    Mr. TILLMAN.   Will the Senator allow me another question?                                
    The PRESIDING OFFICER.   Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from South Carolina?
   Mr. MORGAN.    I do.
Mr. TILLMAN. All of this work in the Indian Territory, I presume, is under 
Indians and half-breeds, whereas in the Hawaiian Islands all of it is the work of 
Americans, Englishmen, and Germans who have gone into those islands, have 
acquired property rights, have seized the government and now control it, 
have formed a government which the Senator finds so admirable, and have 
formulated laws which are so wise. If there is any analogy whatever between a 
little band of four or five or seven thousand Anglo-Saxons in the Hawaiian 
Islands and two or three hundred thousand Choctaws, Cherokees, and Creeks. I 
can not see it.
Mr. MORGAN. Mr. President, if the Senator from South Carolina could 
disabuse his mind of the prejudices which evidently revel in it, he would be 
able to see this subject in a somewhat proper light. The idea of saying that the 
people in Hawaii have taken things into their own hands and have ruled the 
native people, without any restriction to their right is entirely a mistake.
Mr. TILLMAN. Will the Senator allow me to ask another question?
Mr. MORGAN.    Yes.
Mr. TILLMAN. How many legal voters are there now under the so-called 
Hawaiian republic?
Mr. MORGAN. The Senator from Illinois [Mr. CULLOM] to-day stated there 
were--
Mr. TILLMAN. Oh, but the Senator from Illinois said that would be the 
number when those who are eligible under this bill which it is proposed to 
enact into a law takes effect; but I mean the voters to-day, those who are the 
component parts of the Hawaiian government which now exists and which he 
would perpetuate?
    Mr. MORGAN.   I do not know the number, Mr. President; I do not think 
think the number has been given. 
    Mr. TILLMAN.   1 have seen it stated at less than 4,000. 
    Mr. MORGAN.   Voters? 
    Mr. TILLMAN.   Yes. 
    Mr. MORGAN.   Probably so.
Mr. TILLMAN. I will ask the Senator from Illinois, with the permission of 
the Senator from Alabama, how many votes there are?
    Mr. CULLOM. If the Senator will allow me to refer to the same paper as 
to whose authenticity he was anxious, I will read the number. In 1890 the total 
number of registered voters was 13,593; total vote cast, 11,671; voters for nobles, 
upper house, number about 3,800; votes cast, 3,187. That is all the information I 
have about the matter. 
    Mr. TILLMAN. Mr. President--
     The PRESIDING OFFICER.   Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from South Carolina? 
     Mr. MORGAN.   I do.
     Mr. TILLMAN.   I am trying to get the two members of the commission 
who have investigated the subject by a personal visit to Hawaii to tell us the 
number of voters who are now eligible to vote under the existing conditions.   
There is a clause in this bill which requires any man who wishes to register under 
the provisions of the bill to take the oath of allegiance to the United States. 
      Mr. MORGAN.   No; there is not. 
     Mr. TILLMAN.   I will read it to the Senator. 
     The PRESIDING OFFICER.   Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from South Carolina? 
      Mr. MORGAN.   I do. 
      Mr. TILLMAN.   Here is the provision:
SEC. 18. That no person shall be entitled to vote at any general election in the 
Territory of Hawaii prior to 1903 who, having been entitled to qualify and vote 
under the constitution and laws of Hawaii prior to October. 1897, and since July, 
1894, failed to register as such voter, unless he shall take an oath to support the 
Constitution of the United States.


       Mr. MORGAN. That shows how inaccurately the Senator will read things.
       Mr. TILLMAN.   I have read everything that is here.
       Mr. MORGAN.   No oath is required of any voter in Hawaii,
except of those voters who, having heretofore had the privilege of registration, 
refused to register in order to break down the government and in order to refuse 
their allegiance to the republic. We say now when those men come in they must 
take an oath to support the Constitution of the United States-only that class. 
       Mr. TILLMAN.    Well, Mr. President, that brings me back to the original 
proposition as to how many did take the oath of allegiance to the republic and 
how many constitute "the perfect government" which it is said there exists, and I 
will show-and I will find it somewhere in some of these documents-that it is less 
than 4,000, anyhow.
       Mr. BEVERIDGE.   Does the Senator mean as to the upper  house?
        Mr. TILLMAN.    No; as to the lower house.
Mr. MORGAN. The Hawaiian Commission could not take a census of 
those people, and we did not undertake to do it. We relied upon the census 
taken by the authorities of the government being created, so far as we obtained 
it, for a guide to our legislative action.
Mr. WOLCOTT. Will it interrupt the Senator from Alabama if I call the 
attention of the Senator from South Carolina to a suggestion?
    The PRESIDING OFFICER.   Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from Colorado? Mr. MORGAN.   Yes.
Mr. WOLCOTT. I understand the Senator from South Carolina to criticise 
the bill and the measures proposed because the total vote is so infinitesimally 
small in proportion to the population.
Mr. TILLMAN. If the Senator will permit me to correct his impression, I 
did nothing of the kind. I was merely trying to get the Senator from Alabama 
to tell us what is the difference between the republican form of government 
which exists in the Creek Nation, which lie has used by way of comparison, 
with that of the Hawaiian Islands.
Mr. WOLCOTT. Mr. President, being on my feet, I should like to call the 
attention of the Senator from South Carolina [Mr. TILLMAN] to the fact that at the 
last election in South Carolina the Representative of the First Congressional 
district was elected by a total vote of 3,200 out of a population of 173,000; that in 
the Second district, where there is a population of 146,000, the total vote was a 
little over 4,000; that in the Third district, where there is a population of 152,000, 
the total vote was about 4,000; that in the Fourth district, where there is a 
population of 200,000, the total vote was 4,500; that in the Fifth district, where 
there is a population of 142,000, one man was elected without opposition, and he 
only got 4,230 votes; that in the Sixth district, with a population of 158,000, less 
than 1,800 votes were cast, and that in the Seventh district, with a population of 
178,000, the total vote was about 4,500.
Mr. TILLMAN. Will the Senator from Alabama allow mo to pay my 
compliments to my friend from Colorado? [ Laughter. ]
The PRESIDING OFFICER. Does the Senator from Alabama yield to the 
Senator from South Carolina?
Mr. MORGAN. I think I had better turn these gentlemen off from their 
combat until after I get through.
Mr. TILLMAN. But the Senator surely would not allow that proposition to 
go without being answered on the spot?
Mr. MORGAN. I do not think it will hurt the Senator to lot it wait an hour 
or so.
Mr. TILLMAN. But when the Senator gets into one of his interesting 
discussions on these questions--
The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Alabama declines to yield.
Mr. TILLMAN. Of course I will have to yield under such a process of gag 
law as that.
Mr. MORGAN. There is no discourtesy intended to the Senator, Mr. 
President, and no sort of unfairness. I should like to see the two Senators 
have their fight out about this proposition.
Mr. WOLCOTT. I beg the Senator's pardon for having interrupted, him.
Mr. MORGAN. I have yielded to the Senator from South Carolina a good deal, 
and have been trying to do it in a cheerful and good spirit.
I proceed now, Mr. President, to say that the analogy between the 
government of the Indian tribes that I have already spoken of and the 
government of Hawaii was, of course, in regard to the form of government, 
the plan of it, and the liberties that were involved in it. It did not have any 
reference to the people or their conduct. But it is quite a mistake, altogether a 
mistake, to sup-pose that the Hawaiian people have not been fully consulted 
by the white people, as they are called in Hawaii, many of whom are natives of 
the islands, and a large number of whom have some

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