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3817
The CHAIRMAN.   The question is on agreeing to the amendment 
offered by the gentleman from Mississippi [Mr. WILLIAMS] . The question 
being taken, the Chairman announced that the noes appeared to have 
it. Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi demanded a division. The committee 
divided; and there were - ayes 55, noes 78. Accordingly the 
amendment was rejected. Mr. HILL.   It is perfectly evident that this 
bill is not to be read through, and I have two amendments which I 
attempted to offer yesterday, on page 89 and section 103.   I ask that the 
amendments may be considered as pending. Mr. WILLIAMS of 
Mississippi.   What are the amendments? Mr. HILL.   The first strikes 
out the provision for the Territorial Delegate. Mr. WILLIAMS of 
Mississippi.   I object. The CHAIRMAN.   Objection is made. Mr. 
HILL.   Perhaps you will agree to the second amendment. Mr. 
WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   I object. Mr. HILL.   Do you object to 
the second amendment without hearing it? Mr. WILLIAMS of 
Mississippi.   What is the second amendment? Mr. HILL.   It is to 
provide that nothing in this bill shall be construed to pledge any 
future statehood. Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   I object to that. 
Mr. HILL.   I thought you would. The CHAIRMAN.   Objection is 
made. The Clerk read as follows: Sixth. Be able to speak, read, and write the 
English or Hawaiian language Mr. PUGH.   Mr. Chairman, the section 
which has just been read surely is even more obnoxious, if possible, 
than the one which we have just passed, that discriminates against 
the unfortunate poor.   I think it will not be a credit to this 
committee.   The section will disqualify one from voting providing 
that he is physically unable to read or write the. English or the 
Hawaiian language.   Now, I would like to know of the chairman of 
the committee if he wishes to impose that character of 
disqualification upon those people? Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   
A point of order, Mr. Chairman. The CHAIRMAN.   The gentleman 
will state it. Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   To what is the 
gentleman from Kentucky speaking? The CHAIRMAN.   The Chair 
did not understand the gentleman. Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   
To what is the gentleman from Kentucky speaking? The 
CHAIRMAN.   There is no motion before the committee, except the 
substitute pending offered by the Committee on Territories. Mr. 
RICHARDSON.   The section itself is pending, and the gentleman 
can speak to that. Mr. PUGH.   The section itself is pending, and it 
surely ought not to be indorsed by this committee.   The section 
says that in order to be qualified the voter shall "be able to speak, 
read, and write the English or Hawaiian language."   This may 
apply to a physical as well as a mental disability.   An unfortunate 
without an arm could not vote, a man deaf and dumb could not 
vote. This is a bad piece of legislation, which we are rushing 
through without due consideration.   There ought to be an extension of 
the time for the consideration of this bill by the Committee of the 
Whole.   We ought to move along in lines that will commend our 
work to the people of this country and also to the people for whose 
government we are legislating.   I therefore move to strike out that 
section in its present form, unless the committee is willing to 
amend it so that it will not apply to those people who are physically 
disabled. The Clerk read as follows: Strike out lines 4 and 5, as follows: 
"Sixth. Be able to speak, read, and write the English or Hawaiian language."
Mr. UNDERWOOD.   Mr. Chairman, I desire to be recognized in 
opposition.   I see there is only about one minute left before the 
committee, under the rule, is required to rise; and I wish to say this: 
The gentleman from Massachusetts indicated a moment ago that he 
desired to offer other amendments, committee amendments, 
probably important committee amendments.   I do not think there 
would be any objection to his doing it except.this: That an appeal was 
made by this side of the House several days ago, when this bill was 
brought before the House, that we might have a reasonable time to 
consider this bill in Committee of the Whole in order that every 
section could be read and considered, where we could consider each 
section fairly and honestly; and the gentleman when he brought the bill 
before the House must have known that in the time between 12 
o'clock to-day and 4 o'clock the bill could not be read through and 
thoroughly discussed -- The CHAIRMAN.   Under the terms of 
the order made heretofore by the House, the committee will now rise.

The committee accordingly rose; and the Speaker having resumed 
the chair, Mr. MOODY of Massachusetts, Chairman of the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that that 
committee had had under consideration the bill S. 222, with a 
substitute proposed by the Committee on the Territories, to which 
substitute sundry amendments had been agreed upon, and at the hour 
of 4 o'clock, in obedience to the order of the House, the committee 
rose, and the bill is reported to the House. Mr. BARTHOLDT.   Mr. 
Speaker -- The SPEAKER.   For what purpose does the gentleman 
rise? Mr. BARTHOLDT.   To a parliamentary inquiry.   Will it be 
in order to ask a separate vote upon one amendment adopted in 
Committee of the Whole? The SPEAKER.   That was the very 
question that the Chair was about to put.   The first question will be -
- Mr. KNOX.   Mr. Speaker -- Mr. RICHARDSON.   Mr. Speaker, 
I give way to the gentleman from Massachusetts. Mr. KNOX.   I ask 
consent of the House that the time for debate in Committee of the 
Whole under the five-minute rule and for amendments be extended to 
5 o'clock, and that the order heretofore adopted be in no other respect 
modified. The SPEAKER.   The gentleman from Massachusetts asks 
unanimous consent of the House that the time for debate under the five-
minute rule be extended until 5 o'clock this evening. Mr. MUDD.   I 
object. The SPEAKER.   Let the Chair state the question.   And in 
no other respect shall the order governing the consideration of this 
bill be modified.   Is there objection? Mr. MUDD.   I object. The 
SPEAKER.   Objection is made. Mr. WILLIAMS of Mississippi.   I 
want to suggest, as a substitute for that request, this: I will ask 
unanimous consent that the chairman of the committee present 
certain resolutions or amendments that he has in his hand, and 
request that they may be considered as pending in the House. Mr. 
HILL.   I object, Mr. Speaker. Mr. KNOX.   I will say to the 
gentleman that I will agree that his amendments may be pending. Mr. 
HILL.   I will withdraw my objection, then. Mr. RICHARDSON.   
Mr. Speaker, I desire to make a request for unanimous consent in the 
interest of good legislation. The SPEAKER.   The Chair will hear the 
gentleman from Tennessee. Mr. RICHARDSON.   There has been no 
partisan debate, no time unnecessarily consumed, and it is not a 
partisan question, and I ask unanimous consent that the bill be 
returned to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 
Union and its consideration resumed there, and its consideration be 
concluded in the Committee of the Whole, and then it be reported to 
the House. Mr. KNOX.   I did not quite understand the request of the 
gentleman from Tennessee. Mr. RICHARDSON.   I ask unanimous 
consent that the bill be recommitted to the Committee of the Whole 
and consideration be concluded therein, the bill to be then reported 
to the House. More than 30 sections of this bill have not been 
touched.   Many of them are very important.   A number of gentlemen 
have amendments in their hands ready to offer, the committee have 
amendments that ought to be considered, and every gentleman who 
desires to offer an amendment to some of these thirty-odd sections 
ought to be permitted to do it.   We have plenty of time; we can 
resume the consideration and conclude the consideration of this bill 
in Committee of the Whole, and it ought to be done. The SPEAKER.   
The Chair will state the request.   The gentleman from Tennessee 
asks unanimous consent that the House resolve itself again into the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, to finish 
the consideration of this bill in that committee, and, when finished, 
to report it back to the House. The Chair assumes that the existing 
order will then be operative. Mr. RICHARDSON.   Yes; that the 
vote shall then be taken in the House. The SPEAKER.   Is there 
objection? Mr. KNOX.   I shall make no objection on my part -- 
Mr. HILL.   Mr. Speaker, withholding objection for a moment, I do 
not understand that the request made by the gentleman from 
Tennessee is precisely as the Speaker puts it, but that we shall resolve 
ourselves into Committee of the Whole for one hour. Mr. 
RICHARDSON.   Oh, no. Mr. HILL.   If it is understood that we are 
to finish the reading of the bill, I have no objection. The SPEAKER.   
That is the request of the gentleman from . Tennessee.    Is there 
objection?   [After a pause.]   The Chair hears none.   Accordingly, 
the House will resolve itself into Committee of the Whole House on 
the state of the Union for the further consideration of Senate bill 222, 
and the gentleman from Massachusetts.  Mr. MOODY, will take the 
chair.   [Applause.] Accordingly the House resolved itself into 
Committee of the

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